PRAXIS: The Art of Reflective Action

 

Current Content for Consideration

  • INCARNATION AS EMBODIMENT OF SPIRIT by Diarmuid O’Murchu
  • Coming soon: Audio interview with Diarmuid O’Murchu by Omega Center’s Brie Stoner, and further follow-up reflections…

 

Omega Lectio Divina

Below we have provided a selection of quotes. As a contemplative practice, we suggest reading through these passages using the OMEGA LECTIO DIVINA method and outline. Perhaps share what arises for you with a trusted friend or write your reflections as a journal exercise.

 

Quotes for Contemplation

By virtue of the Creation and, still more, of the Incarnation, nothing here below is profane for those who know how to see.

~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Divine Milieu

 

A mystical Christian encounters a person as an encounter with God. This is incarnation now. We allow that person to be who they are because that’s the person God created. I think it’s a matter of looking at the person as an icon of God—one in whom God is shining through… God seeks to be incarnate in an expanding incarnation. The Christ is waiting to be born anew… But Christ cannot be born anew without our saying yes to bringing Christ into the world.

~  Ilia Delio in “Universal Savior: Ilia Delio reimagines Christ” posted at UniversalCatholic.org

 

Without incarnation, God remains separate from us and from creation. Because of incarnation, we can say, “God is with us!” In fact, God is in us, and in everything else that God created. We all have the divine DNA; everything bears the divine fingerprint, if the mystery of embodiment is true.

~ Richard Rohr, “God Is Not “Out There from CAC daily meditations, January 20, 2016

 

[Incarnation is] the eternal God humbly bending down and lifting the dust of our nature into unity with his own person.

~ Medieval theologian Bonaventure

 

 

For Practice and Further Exploration

In his blog post, INCARNATION AS EMBODIMENT OF SPIRIT, Diarmuid O’Murchu states “…the first and oldest body through which God reveals Godself is not the human, but the cosmos itself. Then God’s revelatory creativity is manifested in and through all the galactic and planetary bodies, including our Home Planet the Earth. And within our Earth are several embodied forms, mountains, lakes, plants, animals, even bacteria. ”

  • Consider this statement and how that might impact our relationship to the Cosmos, and to our planet. What would change for you with this expanded concept of incarnation?
  • Can you relate to mountains, lakes, plants, animals, and bacteria as forms of embodiment revealing God?
  • Next time you are walking outdoors, see if you can relate to the land forms, plants, and animals as the embodied divine. Do you find adopting this perspective difficult. What changes in your experience? What do you notice?

There has been a historical emphasis in Christianity that this incarnated life was less important then the eternal life in the hereafter.

  • What changes for you if incarnation in this embodied form is taken more seriously?
  • Does this change how you live your life or how you relate to your body?

Consider as well this following passage:

Salvation becomes our primary responsibility through learning afresh what it means to be authentically human upon our Spirit-infused earth. Jesus achieved this integrity in a uniquely remarkable way, leaving us a blueprint on how to become incarnational people in a more authentic way.

  • What does it mean to you to live as “authentically human upon our Spirit-infused earth?
  • Do you feel a greater sense of duty or responsibility when taking this perspective?
  • How might your life change to reflect this responsibility?

 

Exploring with Others

Practicing and exploring with others is both supportive and helps us grow beyond our individual perspective. Do you have a community of “fellow explorers” to support your inner work, contemplative practice, and understanding of an evolutionary worldview? Where might you find such a supportive community, or with whom could you start one? You can read Ilia Delio’s suggestions and outline for forming a group here.

 

 

An archive of Praxis pages from earlier this year can be found here.